Archaeologists have found that cavemen had been exhibiting off their bling 41,500 years in the past

Archaeologists have discovered that cavemen were showing off their bling 41,500 years ago


YABBA Dabba Doo! Archaeologists have found Flintstones-like cavemen had been exhibiting off their greatest bling 41,500 years in the past.

They discovered an oval medallion carved out of woolly mammoth bone — which might make even TV cartoon character Fred proud — buried in a cave.

Archaeologists discovered an oval medallion carved out of woolly mammoth bone
The prehistoric jewelry would even make TV cartoon character Fred proud

Checks have proven it’s round 2,000 years older than different examples of prehistoric jewelry.

And consultants consider a sample of dots on the 4.5cm by 1.5cm pendant might plot the place of the moon within the historic evening sky.

However the design is also “looking scores”, a report of animals or people killed by the proprietor, a counting system or simply ornament.

Radiocarbon courting was used to search out the 4.5cm by 1.5cm pendant’s age.

Different “private ornaments” present in Germany, which had been beforehand regarded as the oldest, are 2,000 years youthful.

Prof Sahra Talamo, of Germany’s Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, discovered the traditional treasure in rocks in Stajnia Cave, Poland.


She mentioned: “That is distinctive — the oldest identified decoration made by man.

“It units a brand new beginning date for when people began creating ornamental jewelry.”

She mentioned the piece suggests people had been creating complicated social societies — like The Flintstones — sooner than beforehand believed.

The traditional treasure was present in rocks in Stajnia Cave, Poland

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